Image
Image

Gallery
I exist and I resist

Gallery → I exist and I resist

Author:
Ara Chalym (granat-ararat)

Image

Author:
Ara Chalym (granat-ararat)

As a nonbinary person of mixed ethnic background, I see every day as proof that I exist even if other people don’t see me. This work was initially created for the Soul of a Nation competition, which raises the issues of minority rights, but I believe that this illustration fits the Russian reality equally well. Despite the fact that I wanted to show the spirit of fighting through this work, I like the fact that it ended up being even more “childish” than usual—it’s a subconscious way for me to give the viewers a sense of hope, which in our current world may seem naive, “immature”. But we have to try our best to preserve it, hope is extremely important and vital to our society.
My name is Ara Chalym, I’m half-Russian and half-Turkish; I make illustrations and write books. For most of my life, I’ve studied foreign languages, which enabled me to enter the University of Bologna, and now I live in Italy. Since childhood, I've adored drawing and writing, and it’s always been my true calling. Unfortunately, I no longer see a future for myself in linguistics, which is why I decided to change career paths in spite of the fear of making that change in such uncertain times.
My name is Ara Chalym, I’m half-Russian and half-Turkish; I make illustrations and write books. For most of my life, I’ve studied foreign languages, which enabled me to enter the University of Bologna, and now I live in Italy. Since childhood, I've adored drawing and writing, and it’s always been my true calling. Unfortunately, I no longer see a future for myself in linguistics, which is why I decided to change career paths in spite of the fear of making that change in such uncertain times.
As a nonbinary person of mixed ethnic background, I see every day as proof that I exist even if other people don’t see me. This work was initially created for the Soul of a Nation competition, which raises the issues of minority rights, but I believe that this illustration fits the Russian reality equally well. Despite the fact that I wanted to show the spirit of fighting through this work, I like the fact that it ended up being even more “childish” than usual—it’s a subconscious way for me to give the viewers a sense of hope, which in our current world may seem naive, “immature”. But we have to try our best to preserve it, hope is extremely important and vital to our society.